Be aware of potential hacks

If something seems fishy, it could be one of the latest hacks!

In the past few days, I have received a flurry of phone calls from “Microsoft” or “Windows”. Some friends have mentioned on Facebook that they have gotten calls from the IRS. First let me say, those huge companies and organizations will not call you. Let’s call a scam a scam! Read another story about Microsoft scammers.

Today I received an email from a contact with an aol.com email address. I don’t know if this is dropbox share Hackrelevant to that particular email server, but you should be aware nonetheless. The title in the email said
“Review Documents”. The email included a “link” to a Dropbox document.This contact does not ever send me that type of document (see the picture). So it made me a bit suspicious. I called the person to ask if they had sent me a Dropbox file and before I got the entire sentence out of my mouth, they told me that they had been hacked.

The other day I sent out a Facebook post about a company with whom I was considering doing business. One person private messaged me that her “spidey” sensors had gone up and sure enough, the people were gone this past Monday and left most of the office items behind.

If something seems fishy, it could be one of the numerous hacks out there. Do a bit of checking. As good as some virus security programs are, you may find something new that doesn’t get caught by the filters.

By the way, if you are wondering what something looks like when it is shared from Dropbox, look dropbox share realat the image to the right. The headline on the email read: Dee Reinhardt shared an image with you! The email address was Dee via Dropbox with a no-reply@dropboxmail.com address, not the person’s actual email address.

Share this with your friends and family who might not be as computer savvy as you!