Email Scams are Running Rampant!

Don’t be fooled by email scams!

This time of year, and sometimes all the time, we are so busy that email scams may hit without you even knowing it. This article is dealing with email scams, but phone scams can be just as pervasive. Beware – Microsoft, Apple, the IRS, Social Security will not call you unless there is a pre-arranged time established through letters. Emails on the other hand, just pop up in your mailbox and if you aren’t careful, you could become a victim.

Look for the following!

Here is one that recently showed up in my email box. Here are the tips to the email scams:

  1. The address may look normal in your lines of emails, but if you open the email and look at the address, it is not from American Express. On a side note, I can’t remember ever having an American Express card!!!
  2. Notice the Amex Express reference. American Express doesn’t refer to itself as Amex Express. It is spelled out.
  3. Dear Amex Customer, if they are sending me information about updating my account, don’t you think they would know the name on my card and address me that way?
  4. Typos abound. A professional company like American Express is going to triple spell check a template before sending out anything.
  5. Lastly, the images are either off or non-existent. A company as strongly branded as American Express would never send out a communication that was not properly branded.

I am sure there are other tip-offs to the email scams. These are just a quick few that I saw to point out and share with you.

Warn your elders!

I remember undoing the results of phone calls my Mom got while I was at work. Do your older family members a service. Discuss with them how to recognize the potential rip-offs and email scams out there.

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Beware of Email Messages for LinkedIn

Don’t click on email Messages about LinkedIn until you think it through.

I received the email message that is pictured in this image. I had to think about it for a minute or two and really look at the content, the sender and the email to which it was addressed. This was focused on LinkedIn, but it could happen with any platform or service that you use.

Here are a couple of the clues:

Sender – LinkedIn would not be sending a message to me from an Outlook email address. Even though they are now affiliated with Microsoft, they are branded as LinkedIn.com

Address – this got sent to an email address that is not the primary one on my account and it was sent to undisclosed recipients.

Link to click – has nothing to do with LinkedIn.

De-activated – Linkedin does not deactivate any accounts without going through tons of work to get it done. Trust me on this one, I have tried to help customers delete duplicate accounts and it is TOUGH!

Web link – WHAT!!!???!!! this link makes absolutely no sense, why would I click on it?

Date – the way the grammar and punctuation work on this, it looks as if no one proofed it or does not speak English well.

Sincerely. – this could have been a typo, but if a major corporation is sending out a mass mailing like this, you betcha they are double checking and proofing several times.

Copyright – Just because they put it, doesn’t mean it is. PLUS, 2017 Information isn’t the name of a corporation – that is what the copyright is for typically.

All in all, to the untrained observer, they might click on this and BAM – virus or trojan horse gets unlocked. Just beware of any type of email that says to renew, verify, whatever before you click and give them what they want.

Call me if you have questions 708-822-2152.

BTW, Microsoft won’t call you either – read this one: Be aware of potential hacks

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Be aware of potential hacks

If something seems fishy, it could be one of the latest hacks!

In the past few days, I have received a flurry of phone calls from “Microsoft” or “Windows”. Some friends have mentioned on Facebook that they have gotten calls from the IRS. First let me say, those huge companies and organizations will not call you. Let’s call a scam a scam! Read another story about Microsoft scammers.

Today I received an email from a contact with an aol.com email address. I don’t know if this is dropbox share Hackrelevant to that particular email server, but you should be aware nonetheless. The title in the email said
“Review Documents”. The email included a “link” to a Dropbox document.This contact does not ever send me that type of document (see the picture). So it made me a bit suspicious. I called the person to ask if they had sent me a Dropbox file and before I got the entire sentence out of my mouth, they told me that they had been hacked.

The other day I sent out a Facebook post about a company with whom I was considering doing business. One person private messaged me that her “spidey” sensors had gone up and sure enough, the people were gone this past Monday and left most of the office items behind.

If something seems fishy, it could be one of the numerous hacks out there. Do a bit of checking. As good as some virus security programs are, you may find something new that doesn’t get caught by the filters.

By the way, if you are wondering what something looks like when it is shared from Dropbox, look dropbox share realat the image to the right. The headline on the email read: Dee Reinhardt shared an image with you! The email address was Dee via Dropbox with a no-reply@dropboxmail.com address, not the person’s actual email address.

Share this with your friends and family who might not be as computer savvy as you!

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