About DeeReinhardt

Social media, marketing and community relations specialist aiming to help people build their on-line presence with as many social media tools with which they feel comfortable.

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Email Scams are Running Rampant!

Don’t be fooled by email scams!

This time of year, and sometimes all the time, we are so busy that email scams may hit without you even knowing it. This article is dealing with email scams, but phone scams can be just as pervasive. Beware – Microsoft, Apple, the IRS, Social Security will not call you unless there is a pre-arranged time established through letters. Emails on the other hand, just pop up in your mailbox and if you aren’t careful, you could become a victim.

Look for the following!

Here is one that recently showed up in my email box. Here are the tips to the email scams:

  1. The address may look normal in your lines of emails, but if you open the email and look at the address, it is not from American Express. On a side note, I can’t remember ever having an American Express card!!!
  2. Notice the Amex Express reference. American Express doesn’t refer to itself as Amex Express. It is spelled out.
  3. Dear Amex Customer, if they are sending me information about updating my account, don’t you think they would know the name on my card and address me that way?
  4. Typos abound. A professional company like American Express is going to triple spell check a template before sending out anything.
  5. Lastly, the images are either off or non-existent. A company as strongly branded as American Express would never send out a communication that was not properly branded.

I am sure there are other tip-offs to the email scams. These are just a quick few that I saw to point out and share with you.

Warn your elders!

I remember undoing the results of phone calls my Mom got while I was at work. Do your older family members a service. Discuss with them how to recognize the potential rip-offs and email scams out there.

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Fake Profiles – How Do You Know?

How do you know if they are Fake Profiles?

Honestly, I don’t always know what are fake profiles and what aren’t. But I recently read this article from LinkedIn about what they are doing to combat Fake Profiles – An Update on How We’re Fighting Fake Accounts | Official LinkedIn Blog

In the past year my Facebook account was cloned. You can read about that here. I was surprised I was hit because I do all the password things I am supposed to do. I don’t click on suspicious email links. But it happened. It made me very leery about connecting with people that I don’t know, especially on Facebook.

I know I have connected with fake profiles on Twitter. I am pretty sure I follow some fake profiles on Instagram, but not as many. On Facebook, I always look at the invitations from people that I might know to see how developed the profile is and who mutual friends / connections might be. If it is a repeat invitation from someone with whom I regularly communicate, I will send a text or message them through another social platform before connecting.

One of my Facebook friends recently decided to switch her account to a “grown-up” version and sent out several posts alerting people to the fact that she would be closing down the old account in an effort to share the more adult/professional version of herself.

On LinkedIn, I find that not as many people are trying to scam others. Based upon the article linked above, LinkedIn is doing what I would consider a decent job of nipping fake profiles in the bud.

7 tips

Here are my tips to do your due diligence before falling into the Fake Profile trap:

  1. Use a recent image of yourself on personal profiles.
  2. Brand your company profiles with a logo or a different image of yourself.
  3. Personalize any invitations that you send to people who might not know or remember you.
  4. Check profiles before you accept.
  5. Alert all connections if your account is compromised.
  6. If you do connect with a fake profile, be careful of any messages or requests asking for you to send money. If it is out of character, then it is probably fake!
  7. Don’t use the same password for all of your accounts to prevent a mass breech if you are compromised.
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Social Media Plan – Wildly Beautiful or Just Wild

What’s your social media plan?

The other day I was walking along a path and noticed this stand-out wild flower and it made me think about plans – especially a social media plan. When wild flowers are sown (or not) they come up and they are wildly beautiful. On my walk I noticed black-eyed susans, beebalm, coneflowers, Queen Ann’s lace and a couple of others for which I don’t know the name. Just like with social media there is Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter and couple hundred others that I don’t remember the names!

What is right for your brand?

Do your posts just come out based upon your whim at the moment? That would be wild. Creating a pattern that involves planned posts along with an occasional wild one can be beautiful. One bit of information which I learned that I frequently share is 70% of your posts should be other people’s content, 20% should be original content from your expertise, and 10% should be promotional.

Which platforms?

Your social media plan should incorporate what is right for your business. Do you need a wild scattering of posts across all of the platforms, or do you need to concentrate your efforts on 2-3 platforms where your clients frequent? Wild would be the hit or miss scattershot. But, a planned effort on either side of a path might be wildly beautiful. Have you determined which platforms work best for your company? If you are a B2B company you definitely need LinkedIn, but is Instagram a good fit? Maybe.

Wildly Beautiful or Just Wild?

In the long run, no matter which approach you take, content will be added to your brand and allow people to get a feel for what you do and your thought leadership. If you are looking for the wildly beautiful option, make a plan and carry it out. If you need some help with your plan, I would be happy to be of assistance.

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Social media commitment required to succeed 

What is your commitment level to your social media?

I just read this article about social media commitment from the  Deleware Business Times . There are a few points I would like to expand on.

commitment

I can be as guilty of this as the next person. I go for stretches where I don’t post blog articles and then I don’t have new content to share socially. Then I might binge for a bit and have many weeks in a row where I write fresh content. This is where knowing how to schedule things plays in your favor.

Sparse, old or dated content –

I visited a website of someone I met at a networking event. The blog posts on the site were from 2014. That is not going to bring the search bots back very frequently. Write when you feel like writing or schedule a time to write. Save drafts of things that are on your mind and make a weekly commitment to completing the articles you started. If you can schedule the posts for once a week, you are really only spending an hour or so to write the actual articles. If you are using WordPress, there is a plug-in called PressThis that can help you with drafting your ideas. WordPress lets you schedule your posts.

Track what is happening

Using alerts and checking periodically during the day can help you be aware if your content on social media is getting traction. The article says that unanswered posts tells people that you don’t care. If you do find an old post or comment, answer it anyway and apologize in the comment for just seeing it.

Do what you have time for

If you only have time to do one thing on social media, DO IT WELL! Don’t spread yourself too thin because you think you have to be on all the platforms all the time. When people ask me what they should do with limited time, my answer is always create content on your website – blog. Then, pick one social site where the majority of your customers are and use that to drive them back to your website. Use scheduling when possible, or mobile if you can.

If all else fails, give me a call and I can walk you through strategy or take some of the burden off your shoulders. Do what you do best and let me do what I do best for you!

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LinkedIn Search Algorithms

What do we know about LinkedIn Search Algorithms?

All of the social media platforms are typically secretive about their search algorithms. Here is a short perspective of what we do know:

LinkedIn Search Algorithms

Keywords –

Everyone speaks about keywords being the number one search item for ANY platform social or browser. So how do you find your keywords?

One suggestion I make is to create a word cloud. Read one of my previous articles about how to find your keywords with a word cloud here.

From LinkedIn Help about keywords  – (Avoid these things.)

The order of a search result is determined in part by the profile, activity, and connections of the person who is searching.

Our goal is to optimize your search results. Before we return results, we consider the searcher’s activity on LinkedIn, the profiles returned by the query, and other members who have run similar searches in determining the sort order.

More keywords aren’t always better –  If you integrate an extended list of keywords into your profile, it’s likely that your profile will be filtered out by our spam detection algorithms, which will negatively impact your appearance in search results.

Keywords need to appear in your headline and hopefully in your job title. The job titles may have a slightly higher impact on the search result. Go with the more acceptable search term than what you may have actually been titled.*

Add keywords to your Summary, inside of your work experience, and ensure your are endorsed for them in your skills and experience.

Advanced Search Strings

People who know how to use the Boolean search method are quite successful at finding exactly what they want. This article by Paul Cameron of Speed Up my job Search .com gives a great example.

Here is a bonus article I found from 2011 with some valid premises. The thought behind the keywords and adding contract work seems like a way to get keywords in. The alternative to that now would be to add each contract under the company name as a change in job for that company.

Connections

Connect to as many people as you can to broaden your network. So many people think that you should only connect with people you have met in person, but that defeats the purpose of the breadth of a network like LinkedIn. Others say they don’t want to have their customers as connections because the competition could steal them. If you connect with everyone you know (and meet) and some of those you don’t already know,

The more connections you have, the more “detective” work you can do. My adage is that it is not about who you know, but who they know. That 2nd degree connection might be just the person you need for your next contract or job. Sometimes recruiters limit the search to 2nd degree, or a business owner may do the same when searching for a contractor.

Activity

From my research in preparing for this article, I see that the more active you are with relevant posts containing useful content, the higher you could rank (at least in the feed). I have not tested the following statement. I believe that if someone is searching for a subject matter expert, you will rank higher in search results if you also have the right keywords, skills/endorsements, and 500+ connections.

If anyone who reads this has more definitive answers, please share them with me!!

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