Posting Job Openings

Where do you post your job openings?

How many responses are you getting for the job openings that you post? Are you paying a bunch of money and not getting the right candidates? Have you thought about hyper-local postings?

I teach a number of LinkedIn classes to job seekers as well as business owners about LinkedIn. For the job seekers, I also teach a class about using the internet to build a brand for themselves. After we get done with that part, I focus on where job openings can be found without totally relying on the major job search sites like Monster and Career Builder. I would advise business owners the same. Don’t depend upon or rely solely on those major job posting sites. The job seekers get frustrated because they are not getting responses from business. Business is getting frustrated because they spend big bucks and get either a gazillion responses that have to be weeded through or the matches are poor.

I would advise both business and job seekers to investigate some alternatives:

Local Chambers of Commerce

One of the local chambers to which I belong has a very robust job opening site. Members are encouraged to post their openings for free as a member benefit. A couple of job openings that I saw while grabbing a screen shot for this article included an accountant and a project manager. In all there were 31 listings. In 2018 the Elgin Area Chamber of Commerce had  12698 views of the EAC Works page on the website.  These are considered hyper-local listings as the business is usually in the community of the chamber to which they belong.

Association Sites

Another place to post or look for job openings is association / organization  sites. Do you belong to an industry related association? Those are a good place to post job openings or look for open positions. Sometimes the business is required to pay for the postings, but the price to post is well below the price on the big job posting sites.  In most cases the job listing is free to the job seeker. These organizations may not be as hyper-local as a chamber of commerce, but are typically in an economic region of your area. Check out the postings from the Valley Industrial Association.

When posting to one of these sites, you are more likely to receive resumes from candidates who are in the field for which you are posting and are looking to the association site as a niche tool. You might even recruit an organization member who didn’t know they were looking for their next opportunity!!

Whatever your job opening is you may want to consider these opportunities for the next time you want to post.

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Interview – Sell Me This Pen

Going to an Interview can be nerve wracking!

nervous man at interviewThe interview makes or breaks your chance of getting hired. An interview is a sales pitch for you to get the job. How can you use a sales tactic to enhance your chances of getting a job?  For those of you who don’t know, I teach many workshops on LinkedIn for job seekers, and I teach a job search class for using tools on the internet other than CareerBuilder and Monster (oh there is so much more!). In those classes, I discuss resumes, interviewing and many other job search related topics.

I saw an article today (noted below) that really struck me as something that job seekers should attempt regularly. I know when I managed retail stores, I used to have interviewees try to sell me an item I had on my desk just to see how they could think under pressure. These days with the necessity of good workplace skills and customer service skills, most jobs have a sales component whether you want it to or not. Using the following ideas during your interview may help show your versatility and value, and land you a job!

These are the four components of making a sale as noted in the article I read (make sure to read the article itself – it is really good):

  1. How you gather information
  2. How you respond to the information you gathered
  3. How you deliver information to the person you are attempting to sell
  4. How you ask for something (closing)

Here is how I could see this transformed to the interview setting for a non-sales position:

  1. What are the top three responsibilities (insert another applicable word here) that you envision for the position for which I am interviewing? Depending upon what the answers are takes you to point #2 above. Make sure you take notes so that you can respond intelligently.
  2. Listen carefully to the first item mentioned, and make sure you respond to it first. Getting hired or getting a contract is all about being able to meet someones needs or solve a problem.
  3. Be prepared with examples of how you may have already solved someone else’s problem based on the list of items mentioned. Seek to understand how you might be able to go “bigger picture” on the those items.
  4. Asking if the examples you provided would remedy the situation or meet the responsibilities would give you instantaneous feedback. Once you have described a previous situation or an idea, ask “is this something that could work for your business (this position).

Once you read the article you may agree with my take or not, but at least I got you to think about your approach to your interview. Let me know how I can help with your digital job search or LinkedIn profile!

Source: Best Answer to “Sell Me This Pen” I Have Ever Seen | LinkedIn

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Job Search Game Changer

This job search tool is a game changer!

Google Jobs is a job search tool that is definitely a game changer. You don’t have to go to Career Builder, Monster or even Indeed to find jobs listed near you.

There are even filters like:

  • Job Title
  • Location – the distance you want to search
  • Date Posted
  • Type of job – full-time, part-time etc.
  • Company type – the industry of the listing
  • Employer – select one and it filters just those jobs.

You can bookmark the job and save it for later.

In the Google Search bar, I entered the word jobs and then the industry job title. It filtered the jobs near my location.

I could go in and filter more like I listed above, but I was totally impressed. It even ranks the jobs in the order they were posted or close to it.

If I click on the “Blue” job bar, I get the details of the jobs and the listing. I can turn on alerts to match the search. I can share this job to Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and email to someone with a short link.

I don’t know about you, but this Job Search tool that Google has created is going to be a game changer for the job seeker.

Employers will still post their jobs wherever they like and it seems that Google will find it. The jobs I reviewed seem to be coming from Glassdoor, ZipRecruiter and CareerBuilder, but I did see some jobs directly from a company web listing as well.

Take a look at this video to see what I did and if you have any questions, please let me know and I will check it out further for you.

Cheers to all and happy hunting!

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