Newer LinkedIn Features

Have you seen these newer features?

I attended a webinar yesterday about using LinkedIn for business growth and I learned about a couple of newer features that may or may not be available for you. They are something for which you will want to be on the look-out. Who knows, you may already be using them!

Newer Feature #1 – Ring my bell!

How many of you thought of the Anita Ward Song – Ring My Bell? LinkedIn has a relatively new feature that allows you to click on a bell on a company profile or a personal profile and you will get that news in your feed right away. You need to either follow or be connected with the person to see the bell. You can see all posts or tops posts depending upon whether it is marked or solid. You won’t be able to see it on your own profile.

This is not 100% effective. You should see in your notifications the posts from the people / companies you choose to ring their bell. It is recommended by other experts to keep it to 10 bells to avoid too much clutter.

Newer Feature #2 – Schedule Posts in LinkedIn

My team uses a scheduler tool to help us plan our week of posts for our clients. These are allowed by LinkedIn where lead generation tools are disallowed and you may lose your profile. LinkedIn now allows you to schedule a post natively inside of LinkedIn. If you need to schedule from your phone while you are out on the fly, this is available on the top right corner of my Android phone.

Check back for a post on Creator Mode for your business profile.

Open to Work

LinkedIn Open to Work

If you are Open to Work, do you truly want to advertise that? Just a thought. Everyone has their own opinion about this. Mine is that it is better to share that type of information in a more private type of message or a post rather than have a “photo frame” on your profile image. I still feel there is a bias against interviewing or hiring someone who is not currently employed. If you are open to work and employed, with that photo frame, do you feel 100% secure that your current employer is not going to find out (unless you are part of an approved layoff). Unfortunately, I feel that recruiters look at having a current work history shows as making you more stable.

The settings in LinkedIn for the job preferences allow you to enter five job titles, pick multiple job locations, start dates, a variety of job types, and last but not least add a photo frame on your profile image of #Opentowork to share with anyone on LinkedIn including your current employer if you have one.

To me, the more subtle way of approaching this is by selecting the Recruiters only option.

Additionally, I recommend that you never use the words Looking for (insert word related to jobs or work), Open to New Opportunities, or Currently seeking at all in your headline or summary. If you are working at a part-time or fill-in job, you can use the phrase “While waiting for an opening in my career field” I am doing X, Y, or Z. But make someone search for it.

 

LinkedIn Headline

Does your LinkedIn headline help you in landing in search results?

Three places in a LinkedIn profile need to focus on keywords:

  • Headline
  • Summary (About)
  • Skills & Endorsements

It is good to splatter those keywords wherever else you can in your profile, but those three are the biggest spots. They are where people will look the most and where search algorithms come into play.

Think of keywords in your LinkedIn profile the equivalent of organic adwords.

Is your LinkedIn headline searchable keywords?

In other words, do the words or phrases that are in your headline include those words that people type into the search bar if they don’t know your name?

I see a number of my connections that have phrases or “cute” words. Think about what you enter when you are looking for someone other than their name. Do you enter “Enhancing Performance to Drive Business Results” or would something more succinct get better results. If you did changes yours to keywords, are they all run together without spaces i.e. keyword/keyword/keyword. Or do you just have your job title in the headline?

Whether you are looking for a job, own your own business, or are comfortable in your current job, consider using keywords in your headline that tell the story of what you do. If you aren’t sure what those keywords should be, look down at the skills section and start typing in your keywords. The suggested phrases will offer you the proper suffix to use i.e. trainer or training.

If all else fails, give me a call and we can work through your profile to optimize it to help you be found.

Resume vs LinkedIn

What is better a resume vs LinkedIn?

If you are thinking that you only have time to do one thing, what would it be a resume vs LinkedIn? Well I am here to tell you that you can build one and the other will benefit. Read on to find out how. Take a look at the graphic to gain some extra tips.

Keywords

I advocate that keywords are imperative for LinkedIn and nowadays we need them in a resume. So many companies are using Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) that focus on keywords or phrases prescribed by the job posting that keywords MUST be used in a resume.

Functions

Headlines and summaries on LinkedIn allow you to focus on the functions of your job by employing the keywords I just mentioned. Functions are a great way to build a resume for someone who has tons of experience or very limited actual work experience. When you focus on functions, make sure you tell a story about a problem you faced, an action you took and the result that happened. If you can relate it to savings or a gain in money, time, percentage or number a reader’s interest may pique.

Experience

Using functions allows you to include experience that may have volunteer roots rather than paid experience. Depending upon the type of resume that you build, the listing of job experiences can be a chronological listing or may necessitate including the particular functions of that job right there. On a LinkedIn profile you are forced to include your job experiences in a chronological fashion. If you have gaps in W-2 jobs, try to fill in with “consultant” type work. At the time of this writing, LinkedIn is promoting stay at home experiences because of the explosion of child care and elder care happening these days.

General Tips

  • Leave off the address – you really only need an email address, phone number and LinkedIn profile custom URL.
  • Skills – bullet list your top 15 skills. If you can complete your list without using things like Microsoft Office (this is expected knowledge for many jobs) or employability skills the better your resume will work in an ATS reader.
  • Time – avoid including dates on education or experience older than 15 years. While you can tout subject matter expertise, it could eliminate you from the original pool of applicants.
  • Practical and focused – For the initial contact, make sure your resume is focused and succinct. No more than 2 pages. 1 page is better. Leave the artistic resume for the “leave-behind” at the interview. Don’t include an image on the resume you submit initially, the business isn’t supposed to accept it. In this situation, LinkedIn is a must-have. You can have the image; you can add attachments and links; your summary and each work experience can have 350-400 words; you can have as many jobs as you want that are applicable; you can list all of your certifications; you can include 50 keyword skills; and, you can have as many  endorsements and recommendations as you can gather.

Summing it up

You need a resume. You probably need a LinkedIn profile.  Take advantage of the tremendous amount of information that can be added and edited in LinkedIn to pick the best of the best to use on your resume. Take advantage of the file uploads to put your best generic resume on LinkedIn as a file. Both tools can be fluid. Make sure you aren’t building either one and leaving them out to get stale.

Share a Post in LinkedIn

How often do you share a post in LinkedIn?

When I am teaching my LinkedIn workshops I always suggest that you should share a post to your connections 3 – 5 times per week. It doesn’t always have to be brand new content. It can be something you read from a company you follow, a group you are in, or something from your newsfeed.

One source for news you to share a post is the Daily Rundown that LinkedIn places in your Notifications.

I love when I discover new things and just the other day I was floating around LinkedIn and discovered the handy dandy drop-downs in the window when you “Start a Post”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you manage a Company page on LinkedIn, this gives you the opportunity to share a post from your Home page without having to find your company page and add a post from there. It works the same way on a desktop or laptop as it does in the mobile version!!!

My suggestion to business owners is to share something to the business page first and then share that post to your personal feed. Then your employees can also share the post from the company and the views can grow exponentially. Give your sales people or business development team something great to work with regularly.

Remember the reason you want to share information often is to keep your name and face in front of your connections. You never know when someone sees your name and suddenly says, I need to talk to Dee about how she can help my company with social media. They may not see your post but they see the company post or vice versa.

Whatever time period you choose to follow, just make sure it is consistent. If you need help, let’s talk!

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