LinkedIn Search Algorithms

What do we know about LinkedIn Search Algorithms?

All of the social media platforms are typically secretive about their search algorithms. Here is a short perspective of what we do know:

LinkedIn Search Algorithms

Keywords –

Everyone speaks about keywords being the number one search item for ANY platform social or browser. So how do you find your keywords?

One suggestion I make is to create a word cloud. Read one of my previous articles about how to find your keywords with a word cloud here.

From LinkedIn Help about keywords  – (Avoid these things.)

The order of a search result is determined in part by the profile, activity, and connections of the person who is searching.

Our goal is to optimize your search results. Before we return results, we consider the searcher’s activity on LinkedIn, the profiles returned by the query, and other members who have run similar searches in determining the sort order.

More keywords aren’t always better –  If you integrate an extended list of keywords into your profile, it’s likely that your profile will be filtered out by our spam detection algorithms, which will negatively impact your appearance in search results.

Keywords need to appear in your headline and hopefully in your job title. The job titles may have a slightly higher impact on the search result. Go with the more acceptable search term than what you may have actually been titled.*

Add keywords to your Summary, inside of your work experience, and ensure your are endorsed for them in your skills and experience.

Advanced Search Strings

People who know how to use the Boolean search method are quite successful at finding exactly what they want. This article by Paul Cameron of Speed Up my job Search .com gives a great example.

Here is a bonus article I found from 2011 with some valid premises. The thought behind the keywords and adding contract work seems like a way to get keywords in. The alternative to that now would be to add each contract under the company name as a change in job for that company.

Connections

Connect to as many people as you can to broaden your network. So many people think that you should only connect with people you have met in person, but that defeats the purpose of the breadth of a network like LinkedIn. Others say they don’t want to have their customers as connections because the competition could steal them. If you connect with everyone you know (and meet) and some of those you don’t already know,

The more connections you have, the more “detective” work you can do. My adage is that it is not about who you know, but who they know. That 2nd degree connection might be just the person you need for your next contract or job. Sometimes recruiters limit the search to 2nd degree, or a business owner may do the same when searching for a contractor.

Activity

From my research in preparing for this article, I see that the more active you are with relevant posts containing useful content, the higher you could rank (at least in the feed). I have not tested the following statement. I believe that if someone is searching for a subject matter expert, you will rank higher in search results if you also have the right keywords, skills/endorsements, and 500+ connections.

If anyone who reads this has more definitive answers, please share them with me!!

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LinkedIn – More than just Like Comment and Share

LinkedIn rolled out a new set of icons to allow more than just a “Like, Comment and Share”

I saw the article the other day and was hoping that I would be an early recipient of this new feature to allow you to express more than just a “Like” on someone’s post in LinkedIn. LinkedIn introduces Reactions!

It happened today!!! I just went in to check my feed and the new icons were there for me to use. So I quick grabbed a screen shot and came to my blog to write an article and share it with all of you!

Check your LinkedIn profile – the news feed. Find a post and hover over the “Like”.
If you were one of the lucky folks that have it rolled out to you, then you should see this>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

  • Obviously the thumbs up is for the traditional Like option.
  • Clapping hands is to celebrate what someone is saying or the achievement they posted.
  • Heart is if you Love something that someone says.
  • Lightbulb is to tell someone that their comment was insightful. – I would try to engage someone that uses this option to see if they might be able to assist you in your endeavors in any way.
  • Hand to chin face is to reflect curiosity. – If someone uses this option, I would try to engage them to see if they need more insight or use of your product or services.

Here is the link to the original article making the announcement that I found.

Here is the link to the process of making the design. I like the post-it Kaizen board, but I have an even better tool for that! Check out Trello.

I am excited to share this new update in my LinkedIn workshops! Watch for it on your profile soon.

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Press This – How to use this plug-in

Press This used to be a standard feature

Now Press This is a plugin that you must add to be able to use. But if you write opinions on others work or as reference to a further point you are making, it is well worth finding it and downloading.

Find it here:

Activate it. Follow the directions to add the option to your bookmark bar, like this:

Once it is in your bookmark bar, when you are reading an article, (#1 in image below) click the “Press This” on your bookmark bar and you get a pop-up screen like this:

Put a few words or bullets in the body area to help you remember what you wanted to write about. Unless you are super confident, or have time to write the entire article right then, you will want to click the down arrow by #4 Publish to Save Draft.

Remember to change title (image bullet #3)to your words so you are not plagiarizing others work.

That is it! Easy peasy lemon squeezy, you have content for a new blog article. Remember you still need 300 words to make SEO work for you. Quite often, if you have a total different point of view you can easily squeeze out that many words.

 

 

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Export LinkedIn Connections

Why would you want to Export LinkedIn Connections?

There are a couple of reasons why you would want to export LinkedIn connections, but the main one is to use them for your marketing/outreach efforts. If you don’t use the Sales Navigator feature in LinkedIn, you may want to download your connections and enter them into a Customer Relationship Management (CRM) tool. Here is an article I found that lists more CRM tools that I would want to review – customer relationship management software apps

OR, you could just use them in an Excel spreadsheet and work through them making phone calls or sending letters.

Here are the directions: (watch a video)

  1. Click My Network icon in the LinkedIn menu bar
  2. Find the number that represents your Connections on the left side of the screen.
  3. On the right side find the words Manage Synced and Imported Contacts (it is a light gray color.) Click.
  4. Also on the right side find the words Export Contacts and click.
  5. This takes you to your privacy settings where you can download any and all of your data. Select the second option and select Connections. Fill in your password in the pop-up box. You will receive an email in about 10 minutes letting you know your file is ready.
  6. Go back to the screen where you ordered the archive and download.
  7. Unzip the file.
  8. Save as .xls instead of .crv
  9. Sort and use!

You may still have to use LinkedIn or other methods to find things like phone numbers and addresses, but you have the start of the database and an email address.

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