Resume vs LinkedIn

What is better a resume vs LinkedIn?

If you are thinking that you only have time to do one thing, what would it be a resume vs LinkedIn? Well I am here to tell you that you can build one and the other will benefit. Read on to find out how. Take a look at the graphic to gain some extra tips.

Keywords

I advocate that keywords are imperative for LinkedIn and nowadays we need them in a resume. So many companies are using Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) that focus on keywords or phrases prescribed by the job posting that keywords MUST be used in a resume.

Functions

Headlines and summaries on LinkedIn allow you to focus on the functions of your job by employing the keywords I just mentioned. Functions are a great way to build a resume for someone who has tons of experience or very limited actual work experience. When you focus on functions, make sure you tell a story about a problem you faced, an action you took and the result that happened. If you can relate it to savings or a gain in money, time, percentage or number a reader’s interest may pique.

Experience

Using functions allows you to include experience that may have volunteer roots rather than paid experience. Depending upon the type of resume that you build, the listing of job experiences can be a chronological listing or may necessitate including the particular functions of that job right there. On a LinkedIn profile you are forced to include your job experiences in a chronological fashion. If you have gaps in W-2 jobs, try to fill in with “consultant” type work. At the time of this writing, LinkedIn is promoting stay at home experiences because of the explosion of child care and elder care happening these days.

General Tips

  • Leave off the address – you really only need an email address, phone number and LinkedIn profile custom URL.
  • Skills – bullet list your top 15 skills. If you can complete your list without using things like Microsoft Office (this is expected knowledge for many jobs) or employability skills the better your resume will work in an ATS reader.
  • Time – avoid including dates on education or experience older than 15 years. While you can tout subject matter expertise, it could eliminate you from the original pool of applicants.
  • Practical and focused – For the initial contact, make sure your resume is focused and succinct. No more than 2 pages. 1 page is better. Leave the artistic resume for the “leave-behind” at the interview. Don’t include an image on the resume you submit initially, the business isn’t supposed to accept it. In this situation, LinkedIn is a must-have. You can have the image; you can add attachments and links; your summary and each work experience can have 350-400 words; you can have as many jobs as you want that are applicable; you can list all of your certifications; you can include 50 keyword skills; and, you can have as many  endorsements and recommendations as you can gather.

Summing it up

You need a resume. You probably need a LinkedIn profile.  Take advantage of the tremendous amount of information that can be added and edited in LinkedIn to pick the best of the best to use on your resume. Take advantage of the file uploads to put your best generic resume on LinkedIn as a file. Both tools can be fluid. Make sure you aren’t building either one and leaving them out to get stale.

Share a Post in LinkedIn

How often do you share a post in LinkedIn?

When I am teaching my LinkedIn workshops I always suggest that you should share a post to your connections 3 – 5 times per week. It doesn’t always have to be brand new content. It can be something you read from a company you follow, a group you are in, or something from your newsfeed.

One source for news you to share a post is the Daily Rundown that LinkedIn places in your Notifications.

I love when I discover new things and just the other day I was floating around LinkedIn and discovered the handy dandy drop-downs in the window when you “Start a Post”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you manage a Company page on LinkedIn, this gives you the opportunity to share a post from your Home page without having to find your company page and add a post from there. It works the same way on a desktop or laptop as it does in the mobile version!!!

My suggestion to business owners is to share something to the business page first and then share that post to your personal feed. Then your employees can also share the post from the company and the views can grow exponentially. Give your sales people or business development team something great to work with regularly.

Remember the reason you want to share information often is to keep your name and face in front of your connections. You never know when someone sees your name and suddenly says, I need to talk to Dee about how she can help my company with social media. They may not see your post but they see the company post or vice versa.

Whatever time period you choose to follow, just make sure it is consistent. If you need help, let’s talk!

LinkedIn Search Algorithms

What do we know about LinkedIn Search Algorithms?

All of the social media platforms are typically secretive about their search algorithms. Here is a short perspective of what we do know:

LinkedIn Search Algorithms

Keywords –

Everyone speaks about keywords being the number one search item for ANY platform social or browser. So how do you find your keywords?

One suggestion I make is to create a word cloud. Read one of my previous articles about how to find your keywords with a word cloud here.

From LinkedIn Help about keywords  – (Avoid these things.)

The order of a search result is determined in part by the profile, activity, and connections of the person who is searching.

Our goal is to optimize your search results. Before we return results, we consider the searcher’s activity on LinkedIn, the profiles returned by the query, and other members who have run similar searches in determining the sort order.

More keywords aren’t always better –  If you integrate an extended list of keywords into your profile, it’s likely that your profile will be filtered out by our spam detection algorithms, which will negatively impact your appearance in search results.

Keywords need to appear in your headline and hopefully in your job title. The job titles may have a slightly higher impact on the search result. Go with the more acceptable search term than what you may have actually been titled.*

Add keywords to your Summary, inside of your work experience, and ensure your are endorsed for them in your skills and experience.

Advanced Search Strings

People who know how to use the Boolean search method are quite successful at finding exactly what they want. This article by Paul Cameron of Speed Up my job Search .com gives a great example.

Here is a bonus article I found from 2011 with some valid premises. The thought behind the keywords and adding contract work seems like a way to get keywords in. The alternative to that now would be to add each contract under the company name as a change in job for that company.

Connections

Connect to as many people as you can to broaden your network. So many people think that you should only connect with people you have met in person, but that defeats the purpose of the breadth of a network like LinkedIn. Others say they don’t want to have their customers as connections because the competition could steal them. If you connect with everyone you know (and meet) and some of those you don’t already know,

The more connections you have, the more “detective” work you can do. My adage is that it is not about who you know, but who they know. That 2nd degree connection might be just the person you need for your next contract or job. Sometimes recruiters limit the search to 2nd degree, or a business owner may do the same when searching for a contractor.

Activity

From my research in preparing for this article, I see that the more active you are with relevant posts containing useful content, the higher you could rank (at least in the feed). I have not tested the following statement. I believe that if someone is searching for a subject matter expert, you will rank higher in search results if you also have the right keywords, skills/endorsements, and 500+ connections.

If anyone who reads this has more definitive answers, please share them with me!!

LinkedIn – More than just Like Comment and Share

LinkedIn rolled out a new set of icons to allow more than just a “Like, Comment and Share”

I saw the article the other day and was hoping that I would be an early recipient of this new feature to allow you to express more than just a “Like” on someone’s post in LinkedIn. LinkedIn introduces Reactions!

It happened today!!! I just went in to check my feed and the new icons were there for me to use. So I quick grabbed a screen shot and came to my blog to write an article and share it with all of you!

Check your LinkedIn profile – the news feed. Find a post and hover over the “Like”.
If you were one of the lucky folks that have it rolled out to you, then you should see this>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

  • Obviously the thumbs up is for the traditional Like option.
  • Clapping hands is to celebrate what someone is saying or the achievement they posted.
  • Heart is if you Love something that someone says.
  • Lightbulb is to tell someone that their comment was insightful. – I would try to engage someone that uses this option to see if they might be able to assist you in your endeavors in any way.
  • Hand to chin face is to reflect curiosity. – If someone uses this option, I would try to engage them to see if they need more insight or use of your product or services.

Here is the link to the original article making the announcement that I found.

Here is the link to the process of making the design. I like the post-it Kaizen board, but I have an even better tool for that! Check out Trello.

I am excited to share this new update in my LinkedIn workshops! Watch for it on your profile soon.