You need endorsements AND recommendations

Endorsements vs. Recommendations

In September of 2013, I wrote an article about endorsements and recommendations. Since that time, LinkedIn has does some remodeling and the part of the article that addressed product recommendations is no defunct.

Let’s revisit endorsements and recommendations.

Who gives endorsements? Have you written any recommendations? Have you ever shared someone’s profile with another connection? Do all three from a visit to one of your connections profile. Pick the down arrow next to the “Send Message” box.Endorse Recommend Share Profiles on LinkedIn

Endorsements

LinkedIn’s search algorithms use keywords from three locations to help boost you in the search results. One of those areas is your Skills and Endorsements. If you aren’t using the endorsements feature, you could be missing a valuable part of your ability for people to find you in a keyword search on LinkedIn.

I would caution you to carefully choose the items for which you endorse others.  I suggest that you only endorse them for the skills they have selected instead of suggesting skills for them. I would also encourage you to endorse them for the skills that you know they possess. I hear from attendees in my class that they don’t like when people endorse them for things about which they have no knowledge whether the person owns that skill or not.  If you are one of those people, take a look at this post about managing your endorsements https://time2mrkt.com/linkedin/linkedin_endorsements/.

Recommendations

Recommendations are harder to come by.  Many people find it difficult to ask someone to say kind words about them. In our hectic lives, we often forget to say kind words about others. Use the recommendation feature to write a sentence or two about someone with whom you have worked.  The recommendation just needs to include a few of the keywords that the person has used on their profile.

If you are seeking a recommendation about a particular thing, you could send the request and include the keywords in the body of the request. Heck, you may even want to include an example sentence or two that the person could just copy and paste!

Sharing

One feature that I think is often overlooked is the Share Profile option.  Endorse Me for LinkedInThis lets you send the profile of your connection to another connection.  So many times, I am asked who do I know that does X. I go through my list of connections (that I have tagged) and share the profile.  Other times, a connection will ask me to recommend them to a group of my connections. I go to their profile, select share, and send it off with a short message about why I am sending the profile to them.

So many options from which to choose.  Which one do you need? All of them!

By the way, if you are feeling the urge, I could use a boost on my profile for just one of my skills. If you feel inclined, please visit my profile at http://linkedin.com/in/deereinhardt and click the Plus next to the word LinkedIn.

LinkedIn Endorsement vs. Recommendations

One of the most frequently asked questions that I receive is “What are endorsements?  What good do they do?”.  I thought I would put an explanation into words for you.

Endorsements – are a way to give your connection LinkedIn Endorsementsa thumbs up for the skills that they have listed without going through to much effort. Some people think they are a waste of time, but I would tend to disagree. Here are a few reasons:

  • The act of endorsing someone gives you a “post” without having to think of anything to say;
  • Endorsing someone’s skill let’s them know that you think they “own” that skill. I don’t endorse someone for a skill  that I don’t know they possess and I don’t add skills to their profile by endorsing them for something they have not included.
  • Endorsing others might give you an idea for a skill that you possess that you hadn’t thought about including in your skills.

Read more about managing endorsements in this article: LinkedIn Endorsements.

Recommendations – The best part of recommendations is that you can give one to your firstLinkedIn recommendations degree connections without having to be asked. Recommendations are much more thoughtful and descriptive than endorsing someone. This is a way to speak to the quality of someone’s work more than just the skill that they possess.  My caution here is > don’t give someone a recommendation as soon as they have written one for you.  It just looks like “recommendation love” and that isn’t so good.  “Paying it forward” is the thought to keep in mind when you are writing recommendations.  Remember, just because someone writes you a recommendation, doesn’t mean that you have to return the favor.  Perhaps you “pay it forward” to someone else.  LinkedIn used to require 3 recommendations from first degree contacts before they would consider your profile complete.  It is still advised to try to obtain them for your current and past positions.  Just remember, that to write a recommendation or request one, you must be first degree connections with the person. AND by all means, don’t invite them to connect and ask for the recommendation in the same communication!

When you recommend someone, they must approve your recommendation to appear on their profile.  Use your best grammar and punctuation.  Not only will it reflect upon the person about whom you are writing, but it reflects upon you as well. The recommendations that you give, as well as, receive show in your profile for everyone to view.

Product/Services Recommendations – Now if giving and getting endorsements andLinkedIn Product Recommendations recommendations weren’t enough, we have the third option of recommending the company product or service for which the person you are thinking about recommending offers.  This is a great idea if the company is a one-person or small operation. While searching LinkedIn, a company page may appear before they run across the person.  In my case, I am my company so when someone recommends my company, they are recommending me.

I would love to hear your thoughts on endorsements and recommendations.  Tell me what you think!

 

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LinkedIn Endorsements

I am sure by now that you have seen the “Endorsements” on your LinkedIn profile.  This is a relatively new feature from LinkedIn that allows you to perform a quick click and let your connections and the other person’s connections see that you feel your connection exhibits those skills.

The YouTube how-to video below explains:

  • Endorsement Monday’s – similar to Twitter’s #FollowFriday or #FF, take a few moments every Monday to endorse some of your connections.
  • Endorse someone from your home page – Something similiar to the image above will appear on your home page in LinkedIn so it becomes quite simple perform the “endorsement” action.
  • Endorsing someone from their profile – you can also go directly to a connections profile, find the “Skills and Expertise”, and then choose to endorse one or a number of skills they have listed.
  • Managing Endorsements – not everyone wants to show the endorsements for the skills they have listed OR they prefer not to have a particular person listed as having endorsed them.  I show you how to manage those endorsements.

Thanks for reading, and if you would like to endorse me for any skills, here is the link – Dee Reinhardt

Share this post with your connections to help them understand the Endorsement process.

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