Check this checklist to make time for your social media

Does your marketing work better when you use a social media checklist?

I know that when I have a list of things to do, a checklist makes it easier for me. Some people use a digital version. I still like a paper and pencil type of list. OR I put things on my calendar and assign it a time.

Using a checklist for your social media tasks might work best using the calendar method. That way you can dedicate specific time each day, week, month or quarter to getting the things done for your business including your social media checklist.

Some of the things you might want to do would include getting posts out for your business. I like to keep the 70 / 20 / 10 rule for social media posts. 70% of your posts should be content regarding your industry. 20% of your posts should be your own content regarding your industry (like posting this post). Only 10% of your posts should be promotional in nature. That means if you have a 5 posts in a week, 3 should be content you find somewhere else, 1 should be your content and 1 could be a promotion. If all you ever post is sales, people will tune you out. Try to post witty, useful or informative items. don’t always be selling.

Use the tools on your checklist to help you maintain your posting schedule, monitor your goal achievement, check out what the competition is doing and where you will go next.

If you have any questions, or would like assistance in setting up your personalized checklist, I would be happy to assist. In the meantime, you can download this pdf version of the image above – social media checklist

The original inspiration for this article came from this source.

WWYD – What Would You Do?

Knowing the answer to What Would You Do can be difficult

We all have opinions. Some are stronger than others; others, vocalize their opinions louder than others; and yet most, will never change their opinion no matter what the voice of reason/opposition has to say. Playing off the television show, I ask, what would you do?What would you do

Here is the situation:

Recently, I saw a post from a Facebook connection. It was a video and social commentary on a rather sensitive topic. What I saw in the video was a bit different than what the poster had expressed in the written comment. I began to write my response to the post about 5 different times. Eventually, I ended up not typing anything.

Each time I would start thinking I was taking a different tact, but ended up deleting the response because the written word and a post is forever. It is so much more difficult to know the tone and intent of a comment when written than when you are speaking directly to that person because you are able to see the non-verbal communication.

Because of an experience I had years ago on a chat board with trolls who posted to cause a disturbance, I am much more aware of “newbies”, or even someone who has been around a long time, could take the written word out of context and think an innocent comment is a personal attack.

Additionally, I didn’t think that my comment would be taken in the right context as I could be considered on the opposite side of that particular sensitive topic.

Here are some thoughts to help you figure out what you would do:

  1. Do what I did and let the moment pass. I didn’t feel so strongly about the issue that I felt I had to make the comment.
  2. Write your comment and let the “battle” begin. Once I posted a bad review in a “What’s happening in ((You name the town))”. My post garnered a great deal of responses and some were just nasty.
  3. Unfollow the person or shut them out of your feed. ( I have done this before, it can be kind of liberating.)
  4. Try to send a private message to the person with your opinion so as not to take it public.
  5. Make a phone call.

Remember, you will probably not change the opinion of the person to whom you are commenting, so is it worth the angst you might feel when the return comments are heated, pointed or vengeful. (I just had a thought that I wouldn’t be writing about this, if the item or the issue were positive, like beautiful flowers or gorgeous scenery.)

What else would you do?

Associated Colleges of Illinois

Speaking to the Associated Colleges of Illinois on LinkedIn

On November 3, 2017 I spoke to the Associated Colleges of Illinois about using LinkedIn and other social media to reach out to potential students.

I went to LinkedIn and compiled into one document the items that are associated with creating and using a University page on LinkedIn. If you want to download it click this link – University Pages on LinkedIn.

One of the things I noticed as I was researching all of this is the fact that they differentiate Company pages from University pages for the alumni aspect of the pages.

While many businesses have alumni, not all of them will talk up the positive aspects of that business as they may not have parted company in a good way.

LinkedIn has a whole section of videos and resources for higher education professionals. Take a look at them here. I watched the videos and hope to be able to share more information on the differences to other learning institutions who might have alumni like high schools or prep schools.

I also addressed why social media is important to incorporate in overall marketing plans. (Need me to talk to your group about that?) Here is that handout. Why social media

Last but not least I provided everyone with a copy of my current version of the LinkedIn takeaway from when I teach hands-on LinkedIn workshops. It is here – LinkedIn Take Away. (Need your group to learn more about their personal profiles and what to do with them after they are up to date?)

Whatever I can help you with for your social media needs, I am all ears. Give me a call or send an email so that we can communicate about your social communication desires!! Remember I can help you design, build or remodel your overall social marketing plan.

 

Career Day Presentation

Have you ever given a Career Day Presentation?

I am reminded of the commercial on television where the parents are career day presentationgiving a career day presentation and the fireman dad comes in his gear. All of the other dads have a look of uh-oh, he is going to get all the questions.

I guest lecture to a Masters program Marketing class. It is a cake walk compared to trying to keep the attention of a group of high school students.

Giving a Career Day presentation to high school students can be challenging. Some of the go-getters are totally engaged and ask great questions. Then there is the class either first thing in the morning or right after lunch, where all the kids do is snooze.

I am going armed with video in my presentation – it has catchy background music and cool facts. I will be using Prezi for my presentation – not just words, but lots of graphics and movement. I will have giveaways – everybody likes a good tchotchke.  I may even pull out a fun (in my opinion) quiz the kids can take and win a prize – everyone likes the chance to win a prize right?!

My biggest challenge will be that the kids are almost as savvy in my field as I am. They use the latest social media tools. Facebook to them is passe. Snapchat is rage – this week. All the time I hear, if you need to learn how to do something on the internet or a smartphone ask a teenager. The advantage I have over a teenager is the marketing experience I have gained over the years, the comparison for new technologies to old ones AND I can have my selfie-stick in the classroom!

Career Day presentations to high school students are about what you do to interest them in what they might want to do can be challenging. Not all students are college bound, as not all jobs require a college education. Helping those students understand the value of all types of careers is what will keep the world going round.

Wish me luck, watch for the pictures on my Facebook page!

LinkedIn Mobile versus Desktop for your Profile

Can you get the best results for your profile from LinkedIn Mobile?

I just read an article by Catherine Fisher from the official LinkedIn Blog. She has some really great points. This quote is perfect for expressing my opinion of LinkedIn as well.

The biggest challenge most of us face in today’s world is finding time. But making the time to ensure your professional story reflects your achievements and future goals is key to not missing your next opportunity.

Read the whole article here

While I totally agree with what Catherine says, I truly feel that what you can do with LinkedIn from your phone or tablet is a fraction of what you can do if you finesse your profile from a desktop or laptop. mobile vs. desktopI have even noticed a difference in the functionality of LinkedIn between a touch-screen and not.

There are so many things that you can do with LinkedIn. One of my most recent favorites is to add projects to your profile. This gives you the ability to describe a major project = accomplishment in your profile. And best yet is, if you worked with other people in the project, you get to include them in your project description. People who view your projects on your profile or the project on the other people’s profile get to see you too!

The things that I recommend you not miss in your profile are the things all star status on LinkedInthat equate to having a 100% complete “All-Star” status profile. How you use those sections is how much higher your profile will pull in search results. Just like Catherine, you need a profile photo, a summary, a key list of your skills, and a current job. What I also suggest is that you incorporate your searchable keywords in as many of those areas as possible, including your headline.

So all in all, I find that when I really want to work with a person to optimize their profile, I prefer to work on a desktop or a laptop than on a mobile device. LinkedIn is going to have to step up their game with the mobile app if they want people to use the mobile app more frequently.