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Three Things to Retain Employees

What three things can you do to retain employees?

Recently, I heard an interview on WGN radio show by Steve Grzanich of the Opening Bell discuss three things to do to retain employees with Adam Robinson of Hireology.

Those three things are:retain employees

  • Career Path
  • Stable Pay
  • Flexibility

Let me share my interpretation and viewpoint from a workforce development aspect. I am a solopreneur, but I have a history with workforce development from the employer and job seeker aspects.

Career Path

Many people begin a job without knowing how they can progress up a career ladder. For example, you might get training as a Certified Nurse Assistant with the end goal of becoming a Physician Assistant.

  • What steps can the job help you achieve?
  • Will the employer pay for additional training?
  • Is there internal training that can help you advance up the career ladder?
  • Will the employer allow attendance at external workshops and conferences to gain or maintain additional educational units?

This is a very competitive job market for those who are still looking for work. What do you tell prospective employees in the interview process about training retention plans?

Stable Pay

In my view, stable pay means that if you hire an employee you will maintain a consistent rate of pay when possible. For example, if hired as a part-time person at 20 hours a week, the hours don’t fluctuate down to 5 for several weeks in a row. If a person is hired as a seasonal employee, help that person understand what the hours/pay expectation should be. If someone is hired who becomes used to 12 hours of overtime a week and suddenly, without notice, that is cut because of x, y or z, it is unfair. Communication would be key in both of these examples. Perhaps a contract was not renewed and hours for everyone will be cut as of xx date. Another aspect to stable pay could be the anticipation of annual reviews with cost of living increases or performance raises. A new employee should be made aware of what opportunities exist.

Flexibility

For me personally, this is one of the reasons why I love working for myself. If I need to go to a networking event, attend a doctors appointment, run an emergency errand for my husband’s construction business or almost any other reason, I have the flexibility to work earlier or later in the day or make up work I have to do on a Saturday morning. More and more businesses understand the work/life balance concept. Sometimes the declawed cat might slip out the door and boom, there goes 90 minutes of time you owe your employer. Being or allowing flexibility (as long as it is not abused) is one of the things that employees will expect.

Constant Contact Story – Hasty Decisions Can Cost Big

Constant Contact Salesperson got the better of me.

I decided to sign-up for Constant Contact through the link for the Savings Program link on my Elgin Area Chamber site. Check out becoming a member of this great chamber if you aren’t already. I would get a 25% discount and 60 days free to prep my list of contacts, setup my templates and mentally prepare to send emails.

The next morning, I received a phone call at 9:45AM from a Constant Contact salesperson telling me they were my “guide” to make sure I had blah blah blah. I told the person before they got into their spiel that I had a 10AM conference webinar that I was hosting.  I indicated to the person with which I was speaking that I had only a few minutes to complete the call before I needed to prep for my webinar. To be polite I stayed on the phone with the rep to answer some questions. He wanted to schedule a walk through call for me as I had previous experience with Constant Contact. He didn’t bother to tell me that that walk-through was part of the Email Plus plan and since I was in a hurry, I didn’t ask. He told me I needed to have a paid account before I was able to have that appointment scheduled. He made it sound like the appointment times were very rare and I agreed to get my account paid for right away. As I felt rushed I was not asking the appropriate questions about which level of account I was signing up for. I logged into my account and entered my credit card information because I refuse to give to anyone that initiates a call with me my credit card number of out of principle. I was charged $430. I was expecting $180. I finally hung-up on the guy at 9:57AM. I felt anxious, nervous and frustrated.

I had an out of office meeting to attend. When I returned, I saw a “Thanks for your payment” email. When I opened it and saw the $430 amount, I about hit the ceiling. I called and had to cancel my account because I was planning on using the 2 free months to get everything set-up and then pay for a year at the end of the trial period. Now I have to set-up a new account. Fortunately, the Customer Service Rep told me she would make it so that I can use my email address again to set-up the new account. She exported the list with all of the data points of the people I had already entered because I was only getting parts of the data. Let’s see if the CSR comes up with her end of the bargain!

So this is my story to you:

  • Don’t do anything in haste. Make them call you back.
  • I am totally disappointed in the practice that was demonstrated by the young man to whom I was speaking. AND that I let him.
  • I will set up another account,
  • I will use my 60 day free trial, and,
  • I will get my 25% discount.

In the survey I received, I let them know that I wrote this blog article and that it will get posted to my social media. I can’t fault the company, only their rep. I have to accept partial responsibility for this because I was less cautious than I normally am.

Posting Job Openings

Where do you post your job openings?

How many responses are you getting for the job openings that you post? Are you paying a bunch of money and not getting the right candidates? Have you thought about hyper-local postings?

I teach a number of LinkedIn classes to job seekers as well as business owners about LinkedIn. For the job seekers, I also teach a class about using the internet to build a brand for themselves. After we get done with that part, I focus on where job openings can be found without totally relying on the major job search sites like Monster and Career Builder. I would advise business owners the same. Don’t depend upon or rely solely on those major job posting sites. The job seekers get frustrated because they are not getting responses from business. Business is getting frustrated because they spend big bucks and get either a gazillion responses that have to be weeded through or the matches are poor.

I would advise both business and job seekers to investigate some alternatives:

Local Chambers of Commerce

One of the local chambers to which I belong has a very robust job opening site. Members are encouraged to post their openings for free as a member benefit. A couple of job openings that I saw while grabbing a screen shot for this article included an accountant and a project manager. In all there were 31 listings. In 2018 the Elgin Area Chamber of Commerce had  12698 views of the EAC Works page on the website.  These are considered hyper-local listings as the business is usually in the community of the chamber to which they belong.

Association Sites

Another place to post or look for job openings is association / organization  sites. Do you belong to an industry related association? Those are a good place to post job openings or look for open positions. Sometimes the business is required to pay for the postings, but the price to post is well below the price on the big job posting sites.  In most cases the job listing is free to the job seeker. These organizations may not be as hyper-local as a chamber of commerce, but are typically in an economic region of your area. Check out the postings from the Valley Industrial Association.

When posting to one of these sites, you are more likely to receive resumes from candidates who are in the field for which you are posting and are looking to the association site as a niche tool. You might even recruit an organization member who didn’t know they were looking for their next opportunity!!

Whatever your job opening is you may want to consider these opportunities for the next time you want to post.

Using Beaver Builder to Create a Blog Post

Beaver Builder Blog Post – After you have logged in to the website and gotten to the Dashboard.

I just worked with a client whose template employs Beaver Builder. It is a new tool for me and after I got used to it I like it quite a bit. For the pages, there are some things that are difficult to find, but I will make due for now.

Here are the steps and images to use to create a blog post (or most of them for a regular Page)

  1. Select Add Post
  2. Add a Title that includes your Keyword focus of the article you are writing
  3. Make sure it looks the way you want it to look
  4. Edit the Snippet with a sentence that will show in Google Search results. Make sure to include the Keyword from the title.
  5. Find the Focused Keyword Phrase – from your title and snippet. This should not be the same thing all of the time. You have to pick different words or it becomes ineffective. You need to use your keyword in the article itself at least twice.
  6. Click on Beaver Builder to start the article.
  7. Click the + sign to add modules to the box. Pick the style for the article. I suggest a picture on one side or the other unless you are adding a gallery.
  8. Drag it over to the box in the main part of the screen.
  9. Switch to modules.
  10. Select the photo module
  11. Drag it to the side that you want the photo in. The module editor will pop open on the left of the screen. Be ready to add or upload the photo.
  12. Select the text editor.
  13. Drag it to the side that you want the text in. The module editor will pop open on the left of the screen.
  14. Start entering your text.
    1. A – make the first line of the text a Header that includes the Keyword. Click the box next to the B for Bold and select Heading 2.
  15. When you are all done with the text that you want to add including links to pages on your website or to reference sites, then click the Done in the upper right corner. You can save it as a draft OR you can publish. The beauty of WordPress is any changes you make happen as soon as you hit PUBLISH, so you can find a typo and make a change.

Let me know how I can help you with your WordPress site or any of your social media needs!

LinkedIn – More than just Like Comment and Share

LinkedIn rolled out a new set of icons to allow more than just a “Like, Comment and Share”

I saw the article the other day and was hoping that I would be an early recipient of this new feature to allow you to express more than just a “Like” on someone’s post in LinkedIn. LinkedIn introduces Reactions!

It happened today!!! I just went in to check my feed and the new icons were there for me to use. So I quick grabbed a screen shot and came to my blog to write an article and share it with all of you!

Check your LinkedIn profile – the news feed. Find a post and hover over the “Like”.
If you were one of the lucky folks that have it rolled out to you, then you should see this>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

  • Obviously the thumbs up is for the traditional Like option.
  • Clapping hands is to celebrate what someone is saying or the achievement they posted.
  • Heart is if you Love something that someone says.
  • Lightbulb is to tell someone that their comment was insightful. – I would try to engage someone that uses this option to see if they might be able to assist you in your endeavors in any way.
  • Hand to chin face is to reflect curiosity. – If someone uses this option, I would try to engage them to see if they need more insight or use of your product or services.

Here is the link to the original article making the announcement that I found.

Here is the link to the process of making the design. I like the post-it Kaizen board, but I have an even better tool for that! Check out Trello.

I am excited to share this new update in my LinkedIn workshops! Watch for it on your profile soon.